2017 Alex Award Winners

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The Alex Awards are given to ten books written for adults that have special appeal to young adults, ages 12 through 18. The winning titles are selected from the previous year’s publishing. The Alex Awards were first given annually beginning in 1998 and became an official ALA award in 2002.

The award is sponsored by the Margaret A. Edwards Trust. Edwards pioneered young adult library services and worked for many years at the Enoch Pratt Library in Baltimore. Her work is described in her book Fair Garden and the Swarm of Beasts, and over the years she has served as an inspiration to many librarians who serve young adults. The Alex Awards are named after Edwards, who was called “Alex” by her friends.

The Queen of Blood by Sarah Beth Durst
Daleina is determined to keep her family safe from vengeance-seeking spirits, placing her in the crossfire of an insecure queen and powerful spirits.

The Regional Office is Under Attack! by Manuel Gonzales
Fraught with explosive action, female assassins, teenage crushes, and even a cyborg, this fast-paced, dynamic story of revenge explores what happens to a group of woman hell-bent on defending the world from evil forces.

In the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero with Michelle Burfor
After Diane Guerrero returned home from school one day to find her family deported, the 14-year-old went on to combat self-injury and suicidal thoughts, finish her education, and to become a successful actress and citizenship activist.

Buffering: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded by Hannah Hart
Candid and thoughtful, Hart’s memoir details her difficult childhood and rise to internet fame.

Arena by Holly Jennings
Virtual gaming: Kali’s team is competing to win, not to die.

Every Heart a Doorway by Seanan McGuire
Sometimes kids disappear. Sometimes they come back. And when they come back, they need a place to go. At the Home for Wayward Children, everybody has a story, and some stories have better ending than others.

Romeo and/or Juliet: A Choosable-Path Adventure by Ryan North
Take the lead in this choose-your-own-adventure graphic novel. Fantastic, dense illustrations draw you into a Romeo and Juliet retelling like none other you’ve ever experienced. Romance isn’t dead and in the end, maybe Romeo and Juliet aren’t either.

Die Young with Me: A Memoir by Rob Rufus
A story of punk rock, first love, cancer and the incredible power of music to get us through the hardest times in our lives. Rufus details his brave fight for his life in this tender and contemplative memoir.

The Wasp that Brainwashed the Caterpillar by Matt Simon
Simon explores the benefits of evolution, in these odd yet compelling stories that range from creatures adapting to find food to having sex.

The Invisible Life of Ivan Isaenko by Scott Stambach
He has no arms or legs. She has blood that is betraying her. They are the smartest people in the children’s hospital and the only ones who understand, and they take “star-crossed lovers” to a whole new level.

2017 Printz Award

The Michael L. Printz Award is an award for a book that exemplifies literary excellence in young adult literature. It is named for a Topeka, Kansas school librarian who was a long-time active member of the Young Adult Library Services Association.  The award is sponsored by Booklist, a publication of the American Library Association.

2017 Winner

March: Book Three by John Lewis
This graphic novel is the conclusion of the March trilogy, a gripping autobiographical account of Congressman John Lewis’s experiences during the Civil Rights Movement. It follows Lewis’s involvement with the Mississippi Freedom Summer and the March on Selma, concluding with a call to action for today’s youth.

2017 Honor Books

Asking for It by Louise O’Neill 

The Passion of Dolssa by Julie Berry 

Scythe by Neal Shusterman 

The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon 

 

The National Book Award

2010_nba_winnerEstablished in 1950, the National Book Award is an American literary prize administered by the National Book Foundation, a nonprofit organization. A pantheon of such writers as William Faulkner, Marianne Moore, Ralph Ellison, John Cheever, Bernard Malamud, Philip Roth, Robert Lowell, Walker Percy, John Updike, Katherine Anne Porter, Norman Mailer, Lillian Hellman, Elizabeth Bishop, Saul Bellow, Donald Barthelme, Flannery O’Connor, Adrienne Rich, Thomas Pynchon, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Alice Walker, Charles Johnson, E. Annie Proulx, and Colum McCann have all won the Award.

 

2016 Young People’s Literature Longlist:

Booked by Kwame Alexander

Raymie Nightingale by Kate DiCamillo

March: Book Three by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin & Nate Powell (Artist)

When the Sea Turned to Silver by Grace Lin

When the Moon Was Ours by Anna-Marie McLemore

Burn Baby Burn by Meg Medina

Pax by Sara Pennypacker & Jon Klassen (Illustrator)

Ghost by Jason Reynolds

Sachiko: A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor’s Story by Caren Stelson

The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon [due out November 1]

 

The YA Book Prize

The YA Book Prize, presented by The Bookseller magazine in the United Kingdom, is a new award for UK and Irish YA books.

The winner of the 2015 YA Book Prize is Only Ever Yours by Louise O’Neill. 

Other titles on the 2015 short list were:

  • A Song for Ella Grey by David Almond
  • Salvage by Keren David
  • Say Her Name by James Dawson
  • Lobsters by Tom Ellen and Lucy Ivison
  • Half Bad by Sally Green
  • Finding a Voice by Kim Hood
  • Goose by Dawn O’Porter
  • Trouble by Non Pratt
  • The Ghosts of Heaven by Marcus Sedgwick

 

YALSA’s Teens’ Top Ten

 

teens' top tenThe Teens’ Top Ten is a “teen choice” list, where teens nominate and choose their favorite books of the previous year! Nominators are members of teen book groups in fifteen school and public libraries around the country. Nominations are posted on the Thursday of National Library Week, and teens across the country vote on their favorite titles each year. Readers ages twelve to eighteen will vote online between August 15 and Teen Read Week™ (October 9-15, 2016) on the Teens’ Top Ten site. The winners will be announced the week after Teen Read Week.

 

2016 Teens’ Top Ten Nominees:

Alive by Chandler Baker

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black

The Witch Hunter by Virginia Boecker

The Game of Love and Death by Martha Brockenbrough

Powerless by Tera Lynn Childs and Tracy Deebs

Mechanica by Betsy Cornwell

You and Me and Him by Kris Dinnison

The Summer After You & Me by Jennifer Salvato Doktorski

The Devil You Know by Trish Doller

Charlie, Presumed Dead by Anne Heltzel

Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

When by Victoria Laurie

The Novice (Summoner, Book One) by Taran Matharu

Mark of the Thief by Jennifer Nielsen

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

I Am Princess X by Cherie Priest

Hold Me Like a Breath by Tiffany Schmidt

Con Academy by Joe Schreiber

The Ghosts of Heaven by Marcus Sedgwick

The Glass Arrow by Kristen Simmons

Black Widow Forever Red by Margaret Stohl

Every Last Word by Tamara Ireland Stone

Zeroes by Scott Westerfeld, Margo Lanagan, and Deborah Biancotti

Suicide Notes from Beautiful Girls by Lynn Weingarten

Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon

2016 Margaret A. Edwards Award

Margaret-A.Edwards-Award

The Margaret A. Edwards Award, established in 1988, honors an author, as well as a specific body of his or her work, for significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature. The annual award is administered by YALSA and sponsored by School Library Journal magazine. It recognizes an author’s work in helping adolescents become aware of themselves and addressing questions about their role and importance in relationships, society, and in the world.

David Levithan

David Levithan wins the 2016 Edwards Award for The Realm of Possibility, Boy Meets Boy, Love is the Higher Law, How They Met, and Other Stories, Wide Awake, and Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist.

David Levithan has given a voice to teens who often feel marginalized.  His work has allowed readers to experience life and love from many different perspectives.  While his stories are written with high literary quality, they are accessible and engaging to everyone who reads them.  He has been on the forefront of issues that are vital to teens; his writing shows teens the importance of inclusion and the acceptance of themselves and others just as they are.

2016 Alex Award Winners

Alex-AWARDSWinner_lowres

The Alex Awards are given to ten books written for adults that have special appeal to young adults, ages 12 through 18. The winning titles are selected from the previous year’s publishing. The Alex Awards were first given annually beginning in 1998 and became an official ALA award in 2002.

The award is sponsored by the Margaret A. Edwards Trust. Edwards pioneered young adult library services and worked for many years at the Enoch Pratt Library in Baltimore. Her work is described in her book Fair Garden and the Swarm of Beasts, and over the years she has served as an inspiration to many librarians who serve young adults. The Alex Awards are named after Edwards, who was called “Alex” by her friends.

All Involved by Ryan Gattis
Los Angeles, 1992: in the chaos of a rioting city, between settling scores and surviving another day, 18 young men and women—gangbangers, a nurse, an artist, a dreamer—give intense and sometimes brutal voice to their complex human experiences.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates
Coates writes to his 15-year-old son about the inborn hazards of being black in America and his own intellectual, political and emotional confrontation with the need to live fully, even in the face of racialist culture.

Bones & All by Camille DeAngelis
Sixteen-year-old Maren literally eats the ones who love her, bones and all. When her mother abandons her, Maren sets out to find the father she has never met, hoping he can help her understand why she is a monster.

Futuristic Violence and Fancy Suits by David Wong
Zoey never had much ambition beyond being a barista, but when her father leaves her in control of the lawless city of Tabula Ra$a, she goes from steaming milk to slaying supervillains.

Girl at War by Sara Nović
Ana’s early life was ravaged by the 1991 Balkan wars. Now a college student, Ana relives her war and its consequences as she unravels the mystery of herself and the meaning of home.

Half the World by Joe Abercrombie
A bloodthirsty girl and a reluctant warrior are recruited by a cunning minister for a mission that will either save or doom their kingdom.

Humans of New York: Stories by Brandon Stanton
In pictures and interviews that captivate, puzzle and reveal, photojournalist Brandon Stanton collects an immeasurable range of human emotions and perspectives. The photos draw us in and their subjects’ words leave us wondering and cheering at the variety of humanity.

Sacred Heart by Liz Suburbia
Adults have disappeared, and Ben Schiller is trying to keep things together until their return in this unsettling graphic novel. A series of mysterious deaths may be a sign of impending doom for Alexandria’s troubled kids.

Undocumented: A Dominican Boy’s Odyssey from a Homeless Shelter to the Ivy League by Dan-el Padilla Peralta
Overstaying his visa in the U.S. before he was in kindergarten, Padilla Peralta joined other young DREAM Act scholars to erase his illegal status. His humor, wisdom, success and very American boyhood smash anti-immigration stereotypes.

The Unraveling of Mercy Louis by Keija Parssinen
Mercy, a high school basketball star, lives under the thumb of her grandmother, a fierce believer in Y2K as the apocalypse. The year 1999 alters Mercy’s life in a small Texas refinery town and gives her a future beyond it.